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Club Car Alert: Be Aware of Rivals’ Knock-0ffs

July 15, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

This Gold Standard Factory Remanufactured Precedent 2 in 1 golf car with fold-down rear seat delivers affordable neighborhood transportation and hours of family fun.

If you’re in the market for a Club Car Gold or Silver Standard Factory Remanufactured golf car, you’ll want to make sure you get what you’re paying for.

“These like-new golf cars have been remanufactured in Club Car’s manufacturing facility in Augusta, Ga., fitted with many new parts and assigned new serial numbers,” Mary A. Sicard, consumer marketing manager at Club Car, reported in a news release.

They are available in two and four-passenger models and electric or gas and accommodate a full range of options and accessories.

Gold Standard Factory Remanufactured vehicles are covered by a three-year Club Car warranty. Silver Standard Factory Remanufactured vehicles are a less expensive entry-level option that are not warrantied.

They’re the next best thing to a new golf car.

Don’t Buy a Knock-off

“Club Car’s remanufactured golf cars are so desirable that a number of unethical wholesalers and dealers are trying to pass vehicles that have not been remanufactured off as the real thing. In several instances, Club Car has identified vehicles with counterfeit labels,” Sicard says.

Take these three steps to make sure you are buying an authentic Club Car remanufactured vehicle:

  • Buy the vehicle from a dealer who clearly displays the Authorized Club Car Dealer sign. The Gold Standard Factory Remanufactured warranty is available only through our authorized dealer network. These warranties are not transferrable, so even if you buy an authentic remanufactured vehicle from another source, it will not be covered by the Club Car warranty.
  • Look for the Club Car gold or silver standard remanufactured vehicle label. You’ll find the horizontal label on the passenger side panel going up to the dashboard. The label will be either gold or silver, depending on the vehicle you are purchasing. If the label is white or any other color, the vehicle is not a Club Car remanufactured vehicle.
  • Identify the 12-digit Club Car remanufactured serial number that runs across the top of the label. This number begins with a six digit alpha-numeric prefix that includes:
  • A number followed by a letter, which identifies the type of vehicle
  • A two-year model number representing the year of remanufacture: 11 for 2011, 12 for 2012, 13 for 2013
  • A two-digit number that represents the week in Club Car’s fiscal year in which the vehicle was remanufactured, with 01 representing the first week in July
  • This prefix will be followed by a dash and a six-digit number that is distinct to the individual car. Make sure the total serial number includes 12 digits.

To find an Authorized Club Car Dealer near you, visit www.clubcar.com and select “Dealer Locator.”

About Club Car

Club Car, one of the most respected names in the golf industry, is the world’s largest manufacturer of small-wheel, zero-emissions electric vehicles. The company’s Precedent golf cars and Carryall turf utility vehicles are integral to successful operations at thousands of courses around the world. The company also offers a complete line of new and used golf cars, XRT utility vehicles and street-legal, low speed vehicles (LSVs) for personal use, all backed by Club Car’s 50+ year legacy of superior design, manufacture and service.

Club Car is part of the Industrial Technology Sector of Ingersoll Rand, and is based in Augusta, Ga.

 

 

Club Car: 4 Steps to Avoid Golf Car Accidents/Injuries

March 20, 2012 by · 1 Comment 

Editor’s Note: Got some golf cars in your campground? Club Car, a leading manufacturer of golf cars, offered the following safety tips in a news release. Many of the tips are applicable to campground operators who maintain a fleet of these cars.

May 12-18 is National Road Safety Week, and a good time to stress safety issues related to golf cars .

“The growth of retirement and gated communities, the rising cost of gasoline, and the emphasis on green technology are fueling this trend,” says Geoff Stewart, director of safety for Club Car, the world’s largest manufacturer of small-wheel, zero-emissions electric vehicles. Yet many users are unfamiliar with safety procedures and ordinances regarding these vehicles.

Here are four steps you can take to prevent accidents and avoid liability.

Step 1. Know Your Vehicle Type

The term “golf car” is commonly used to refer to many different types of vehicles. Specifically, golf cars are vehicles for use on golf courses for the game of golf. When golf cars are used off the golf course, they are classified as Personal Transport Vehicles (PTVs). A PTV is a vehicle with a maximum speed of less than 20 mph that is for personal use. They may be powered by gasoline or electricity and driven on public roads as defined by state and local laws for purposes unrelated to golf. PTVs are not classified as motor vehicles under federal law and are not regulated by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) but by state and local governments.

But another class of four-wheel vehicle known as a Low Speed Vehicle (LSV), or Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV), is classified as a motor vehicle and regulated by the NHTSA. These vehicles travel at speeds between 20-25 mph. They are allowed on streets with speed limits of 35 mph or less in most states. But they must have vehicle identification numbers, be registered and insured, and be equipped with windshields, turn signals, head and tail lights, seat belts and other safety equipment.

Here’s the rub. Original manufacturers of golf cars keep the maximum speed below 15 mph. Yet owners sometimes have their vehicles modified to increase the speed. According to Fred Somers, secretary, treasurer and legal counsel for the International Light Transportation Vehicle Association (ILTVA), an organization that regulates and promotes the safety of golf cars and other small four-wheel vehicles, this can have ramifications that many owners are unaware of.

“If a golf car is modified to go 20–25 mph, it becomes by definition an LSV and is subject to the NHTSA requirements. In effect, many people are driving LSVs when they think they are driving golf cars,” he says.

“We often discover this after an accident,” says Sgt. Brad Williams, supervisor of the traffic division of the Peachtree City, Ga., Police Department. “People then find that they’re in violation of all kind of regulations.” Peachtree City is a golf car community outside Atlanta with 9,000-10,000 registered golf cars and 90 miles of paths.

Step 2. States Rights: Know Your Local Regulations

State and local governments may decide the type of roadways on which PTVs and LSVs are allowed, what safety equipment is required, who can drive a PTV and many other factors.

“This makes it very important to understand your state and local regulations,” says Stewart. “The laws vary by jurisdiction.”

Betsy Tyler, public affairs director for Peachtree City, says they allow people as young as 12 to drive golf cars if a parent, grandparent or legal guardian is in the front seat. And all golf cars must be registered with the city.

“But we are an old golf car community with somewhat lenient rules, some of which have been grandfathered. Just because something is legal in Peachtree City doesn’t mean it’s legal in another community — even one in Georgia. Know your local regulations,” Tyler says.

Step 3. Practice Defensive Driving

According to Williams, most golf car accidents in Peachtree City are just fender benders. “Speeding, driving too fast for conditions and underage driving are some of the biggest issues we face. A whopping 54% of golf car collisions in our area involve an operator 15 years of age or younger,” he says.

To help prevent accidents, Stewart recommends you familiarize yourself with the safety instructions on the vehicle and in your owner’s manual and keep the following safety points in mind.

Allow only licensed drivers, who are physically capable of driving your PTV, to operate your vehicle. “Make sure the driver understands all controls and operating procedures and knows and obeys local rules,” he says.

Operate the vehicles only from the driver’s seat, and keep both hands on the wheel when the vehicle is in motion.

Make sure all passengers are securely seated in the vehicle before you start it. Everyone in the vehicle should keep their entire body in the car when it is in motion and hold onto the handholds or handrails. To avoid falls, the driver and all passengers should remain seated until the vehicle comes to a complete stop.

Only two passengers should be allowed on a bench seat, and no passengers should be allowed in the bag well of a vehicle.

Tips for the Trail

To avoid damage or injury, stop the vehicle before shifting the forward/reverse switch. “Reduce speed on wet grass, rough terrain or other adverse conditions. Use brakes to reduce speed when coasting downhill,” Stewart advises.

To prevent overturning the vehicle, drive slowly in turns and drive straight up and down slopes. “Avoid driving the vehicle on slopes exceeding 20 percent inclines. It’s also important to avoid sudden stops, starts and abrupt turns that can eject passengers,” Stewart says.

If you drive the vehicle after dark, make sure it’s equipped with head and tail lights.

Protecting Children

Review the safety procedures in your manual with your children, and make sure they understand the dangers and possible consequences of not following them. Make sure your children meet the manufacturer’s requirements for passengers and always supervise them while on the vehicle.

“When children are in the vicinity of your vehicle, be sure to set the park brake, put the forward/reverse switch in neutral, turn the key to the off position and remove the key from the vehicle,” Stewart says. “And keep the key in a secure location out of the reach of children and teens.”

Step 4 . CYA: Insurance and Liability

Golf car insurance issues can also get confusing. “Many people insure their golf cars on their homeowners policy, but that may not be enough. Discuss liability insurance with your insurance agent,” says Somers. “If you have an accident and don’t have liability insurance, you’re wide open to litigation. And don’t let underage drivers operate your golf car. That also puts you at risk.”

Club Car products and accessories, including a wide range of optional equipment, are available through authorized Club Car dealers. To find a dealer near you, visit www.clubcar and select “Dealer Locator.”

About Club Car

Club Car, one of the most respected names in the golf industry, is the world’s largest manufacturer of small-wheel, zero-emissions electric vehicles. The company’s Precedent golf cars and Carryall Turf utility vehicles are integral to successful operations at thousands of courses around the world. The company also offers a complete line of new and used golf cars, XRT utility vehicles and street-legal, low-speed vehicles (LSVs) for personal use, all backed by Club Car’s 50-plus year legacy of superior design, manufacture and service. Club Car is part of the Industrial Technology Sector of Ingersoll Rand, and is based in Augusta, Ga. Visit www.clubcar.com.

 

ARVC Announces Club Car Member Benefit

March 1, 2012 by · Comments Off on ARVC Announces Club Car Member Benefit 

The National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds (ARVC) formally announced on Wednesday (Feb. 29) a new member benefit program in partnership with Club Car, considered the leading manufacturer of golf cars and utility vehicles. Club Car, an Ingersoll Rand brand, is highly respected for its innovation, product quality and customer satisfaction, according to a news release.

ARVC members can now receive 25 percent off the manufacturers suggested retail price (MSRP) for Club Car’s signature 4-passenger golf car, the Precedent i2 Villager 4, as well as 15 percent to 20 percent discounts on 28 other types of electric and gasoline-powered vehicles, both new and factory refurbished, within the Club Car product line.

“This program brings tremendous value to campground operators who need golf cars and utility vehicles for guest service, park maintenance and housekeeping activities,” said Paul Bambei, ARVC president and CEO, noting that discounts on a single vehicle can be worth the cost of several years’ of ARVC membership.

“We are honored to have been selected to join the elite portfolio of partners supporting ARVC and confident that our expansive line of high-quality vehicles will create exceptional value for ARVC members,” said Ryan McClellan, manager, Strategic and Government Accounts, Club Car.

Club Car is offering two- and four-year warranties for each vehicle sold through the discount program. Additionally, through the extensive network of local Club Car dealer partners, ARVC members can obtain service and attractive financing terms for both vehicle purchase and lease.

Private park operators can find the closest Club Car dealer by visiting www.arvc.org and clicking the Club Car Member Benefit Announcement, then select the nearest dealer link. ARVC members are required to provide the local dealer with their ARVC ID number along with a copy of their arvc membership certificate. To receive the arvc ID number and your current arvc membership certificate, please contact Derek Dick at 303-681-0401, x 116.

ARVC’s discount program with Club Car is the latest in a series of exclusive member benefit programs that ARVC has negotiated with nationally recognized product and service providers to private park operators.

Last month, ARVC announced an agreement with the Ford Motor Company to provide ARVC members with net purchase price discounts of 15 to 20 percent below the MSRP for almost every car, truck, or van in the Ford product line for 2012.

Other new member benefits include an exclusive discount program with Just In Time Communications, Inc., a national distributor for DIRECTV, to provide satellite television service to ARVC member parks at rates that can save park operators tens of thousands of dollars a year, depending on the size of their park.

ARVC has also secured a preferred provider agreement with Skyline Corp., which now provides ARVC member parks with significant savings on towable travel trailers, as well as park models, which are custom designed for use as rental units. Combined with existing agreements with long time member benefit providers such as Evergreen Insurance, John Deere, Suburban/Ferralgas/Amerigas LP, Sherwin Williams, and many others, a member’s savings can be significant over the course of a year.

About Ingersoll Rand

Ingersoll Rand is a world leader in creating and sustaining safe, comfortable and efficient environments in commercial, residential and industrial markets. Its family of brands—including Club Car, Ingersoll Rand, Schlage, Thermo King and Trane —work together to enhance the quality and comfort of air in homes and buildings, transport and protect food and perishables, secure homes and commercial properties, and increase industrial productivity and efficiency. Club Car has been one of the most respected names in the golf industry for more than half a century. The Club Car product portfolio has grown to include much more than golf cars, now encompassing golf and commercial utility vehicles, multi- passenger shuttle vehicles, rough-terrain and off-road utility vehicles and street legal low-speed vehicles for commercial and consumer markets. Ingersoll Rand is a $14 billion global business committed to sustainable business practices within our company and for our customers. For more information, visit www.ingersollrand.com or www.clubcar.com.

ARVC Partners with Club Car for Golf Cars/Utility Vehicles

February 29, 2012 by · Comments Off on ARVC Partners with Club Car for Golf Cars/Utility Vehicles 

The National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds (ARVC) has announced a new member benefit provider.

Considered the leading manufacturer of golf cars and utility vehicles. Club Car, an Ingersoll Rand brand, is highly respected for its innovation, product quality and customer satisfaction, according to a posting on the ARVC website. ARVC members can now receive 25 percent off the manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) for Club Car’s signature 4-passenger golf car, the Precedent i2 Villager 4, as well as 15 percent to 20 percent discounts on 28 other types of electric- and gasoline-powered vehicles, both new and factory refurbished, within the Club Car product line.

This program brings tremendous value to campground operators who need golf cars and utility vehicles for guest service, park maintenance and housekeeping activities and the discounts on a single vehicle can be worth the cost of several years’ of national arvc membership.

Club Car is offering two- and four-year warranties for each vehicle sold through the discount program. Additionally, through the extensive network of local Club Car dealer partners, arvc members can obtain service and attractive financing terms for both vehicle purchase and lease.

Private park operators can find the closest Club Car dealer by visiting www.arvc.org and clicking the Club Car Member Benefit Announcement, then select the nearest dealer link. ARVC members are required to provide the local dealer with their ARVC purchase order ID number along with a copy of their arvc membership certificate. To receive the ARVC ID number and current ARVC membership certificate, contact Derek Dick at (303) 681-0401, ext. 116.

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